Why I Believe in an Abrahamic God?

Someone named Emily asked me why I believe in an Abrahamic God. Since I need to post more and this is a pretty good question. I am therefore going to try and answer that.

The easiest question is that I was raised in a Christian family, and that my idea of what God is comes from a Christian concept. That is however, not really what I believe. To be honest, I’m not very comfortable calling myself a Christian. It’s not that I have an overall negative experience of Christianity, I’d call my relationship to my birth-religion very good. The problem is that I cannot reconcile my soul to the idea of Christ as Savior. I can say I believe in God, to an extent I even believe in Christian concepts of sin, but I can’t get my mind around the idea that Jesus Christ died for my sins. I am on my way to working all this out in my head, but there is still the details were I am not a normal Christian.

My concept of God is probably one of these, although with the rise of feminism I might not be that off. To put it simply, I think it’s insulting to the idea of God to just refer to God in the masculine. That is why I believe that God has both masculine and feminine aspects in the highest form we can perceive God as without God turning into Cosmic Nothingness. This is a theory I picked up from Hinduism, that believes the highest form of God is androgynous. However, this is not entirely outside the area of the Abrahamic Religions. Kaballah supposes that God has both male and female aspects, though admittedly the early Kabbalists had a negative view of that feminine side.

I also believe that when you get right down to it, the One God is alot more complex then most people give It credit for. There is kind of an unfortunate sterotype that God is an old bearded man who sits on a cloud fashioning plans for wombats. This strikes me as a rather limited view of a being that created the Universe. To explain this I am taking a rather neoplatonic view of divinity. According to Neoplatonism, all life emenates from God, which at it’s highest point is beyond our understanding. This thing we call the Monad, or the One, or the Ayin(the Kabbalists call it that, it’s Hebrew for Nothingness). The Monad emanates down into lower forms, which make up lesser divine beings and eventually the material world. Kaballah is handy for this, because it gives a system to how this works, which probably has it’s own inaccuracies given the subject matter, but humans like maps, so there.

The ultimate problem in believing in the Abrahamic God is the level of Hugeness that the Abrahamic God encompasses. You are basically dealing with a being that is beyond our comprehension. To call this God a being seems to be limiting it. This is something I have in common with Islam, which is probably one of the most monotheistic religions in the world. They don’t even allow pictorial art because it might lead to idolatry. I’m fine with icons however, and believe that there is a bit of Godstuff in all of us, but I understand the point. If we think to much on an image, we begin to be stuck by it and put to much thought into it. That said, since the God that exists out there is so beyond our comprehension, then it is comfortable to have an intercessor of some kind, a bit of God that is not the Ayin. In Genesis, this is solved by having a God that can get down in the dirt (Genesis 2). In Christianity, we have an even more forward step were God becomes human.

Anyways, these are the thoughts I had on this. More thoughts on God will follow.

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